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. the same thing can exist for education. it personalized health care system and education system available to the student and available to anyone of any age on any platform at any time. the advances you see in entertainment and gaming are possible in health care, education and all government services. >> if we can dig down into education a bit more because i think the disparity in our education system, the haves and have nots in terms of education is another major barrier in terms of keeping the american dream alive. our education system has basically worked the same from inception. the classroom that my daughter will be in looks like the one i was in. looks like the one my parents were in. it seems like that we may may be on the verge of a technological revolution. some example i will give you is these massive open online courses where high level institutions like harvard and mit are opening up courses to thousands of people around the world, typically free and typically no credit given. students are grading each other because there so many you could never hope to have a professor grade a
kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not.
was six-years old. he was a special education uden hisaren issd a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, the special education teacher, anne marie murphy. the teachers in that school, the principal, psychologist, the teachers that die protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those who survived, they are true heroes and they have not received the recognition, in my judgment, that they deserve. i point out that every one of them is a public-school teacher, a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> do wonderbout ts nes we are making about mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun violence in the district of columbia where people have been killed by firearms, prince george's county as well. are you suggesting to me that everyone who pulled a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, if you look at the virginia tech guide, and jared loughner, he was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic, which you could see
shockckley was 6 years old. he was a spepecial-education uden his p parents issued a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, a special- education teacher, , an marie murphy. 52, mother of four. the teachers of that school, the principa psychologist, the teacher that by protecting their children, saving their children, comforting theirir children, those th survived, they arerue heroes. theyave not received the recognition that they deserve. i would point out, everyone of ththem is a public schoolteacher. a group that has been c condemned vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> i do wonder about this nexus we are making between n mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun -- violence where people were killed with fire arms, in prince george's county, too. are you suggesting that everyone who pulls a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, you look at jerry loughner, virginia tech loughner was diagngnosed as a paranoid schizophric, which you could see on day one. i am not sure abou
of the universities are earning more than ever. so i think more investment in training and education would help. >> what about the number, 250, 400 or 1 million in terms of where that threshold will be, where taxes will be raised? >> i think that all those numbers matters, but the important thing about the fiscal cliff is there will be a big increase, the payroll deduction will hit all families, middle class, working family. >> the 2%. >> yes. the unemployment extension will end. there's a tremendous amount of taxes that will go on lower income and middle-income americans if it goes into effect. >> let me ask you this, though. in that idea that you've just been describing, then, should middle-class tax rates also be cut? >> i think that would help -- well, we need to reach a consensus. what we saw was sort of policy pa razz. in indiana, they privatized their system, a republican idea that you need to create more incentives. to be frank, it didn't work. in massachusetts the idea was improving education, that's a liberal idea. and that didn't quite work, either. massachusetts has the best educate
. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make it without being expelled. he is c
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
founders were not so foolish as to suppose that freedom can thrive or survive without appropriate education and nourishments of character. they understood this must mean education broadly understood to include not just schools, but all the institutions of civil society that explain freedom and equip citizens with the virtues freedom requires. these virtues includes self- control, modernization. these reinforce the rationality essential to human happiness. notice when madison like the founding father's generally spoke of human nature, he was not speaking as modern progressives do as manage inconstant, something evolving, something constantly formed and reformedly changing social and other historical forces. when people today speak of nature, they generally speak of flora and trees and animals and other things not human. but the founders spoke of nature as a guide to and as a measure of human action. they thought of nature not as something merely to be manipulated for human convenience but rather as a source of norms to be discovered. they understood that natural rights could not be asserted,
of the epa. they talk about the cannot of education, the department of agency and epa waste of money. >> cost too much, all about regulations. are you one of the few people employed to this organization who has been to north korea. >> twice. i hope to go back again soon. >>> just ahead, a warning to democrats from republicans, they will not write a blank check to solve the fiscal cliff. reaction from debbie snab now of michigan, next. >>> plus, the best selling river of "gone baby gone" and mystic river" has a new crime to solve. where is his dog? dennis lahane is asking for help finding his dog tessa. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
started out as an easiest, then became a collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the originals found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to collect the
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
as her husband, lizzie was much better educated having attended both elementary and boarding schools and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing this exceedingly capable woman couldn't do from layingly knoll yum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away in england, and later she helped to run the mill's boarding house. she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there was no economic reason for her to be absorbing these responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and development. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, but lizzie had raised his children as her own and given birth to eight more as well. of these ten children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of accomplishment, all were thriving. nelly and nina, 23 and 20, had grown into smart, educated youn
educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant victory for the muslim brotherhood, was this silent majority that was speaking? >> i'm not sure it's a silent majority. you have islamists which is probably like 30% of the country the rest are as you know, one-third of the country is illiterate. they are being told that this is stability. i think they have right to think that way. going through turbulent time for two years, if you tell them this
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has ground. n.ese are -- has grown a these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for its. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and yo
remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacation that he was optimistic. logistically the white house will tell you it's possible. when you listen t
inevitability -- that we withdraw, that they will revert to the punishment of women, failure to educate, and i think that weighs on our conscience. that is not justification for a war. >> i believe i read somewhere that they are talking about giving women a break, the taliban. >> we do not know. if we had left some years ago if al qaeda would have come back. you cannot prove that. >> all right, syria. how did the united states, how did the government, how did the administration handled syria? appropriately? and appropriately? enough? not enough? >> the good thing about the afghanistan and iraq forces that they are keeping us out of syria. >> syria could become a disaster. this is a country with a huge stockpile of chemical weapons, which are pretty active. we have allowed the saudis and qataris to arm the rebels, and those are the people who have armed the islamists, so the islamists now have the upper hand among the rebels. the west -- the british and french and we and the turks -- did not do anything comparable with the non-islamic opposition. we are looking at a possible country that would
a foundation that helps troops returning home ret pay for education costs. >> the focus really is on the the men and women, the veterans and the spouses that we provide it's scholarships for and it's about futures men and their futures much more what so than about what happened in the past. marie's >> reporter: but marie's journey also also contains a second love story. she's now remarried to joe shenten, a chicago businessman.ssman. tell me about joe. >> tell >> he is probably the best he i surprise in my life so far. i didn't think that -- i wasn't n't looking to be in another relationship.nk i didn't think that i would ever w find someone like him. and and he is able to embrace all of these things my past my life my l pat and to love all of them and th to love me just for who i am. it's and it's been this great gift t that he's given me. >> reporter: i walked in here i today and joe is wearing a pat and tilman hat. a he still plays a large role in >> your new lives. >> he does. >> >> reporter: and everyone's c comfortable with that? that. >> yeah it's
? >> she has been reading. she's been doing everything possible to keep up with her education, because that's her thing. she wants girls and children around the world to get educated. >> such an absolutely inspiring story, sad story, too. do we know, have any idea when she is going to get out of the hospital? >> not yet. she still has to do that reconstructive surgery in january. so, some serious therapy that has to happen. >> i assume they will have surgeries throughout, oftentimes it takes a series of surgeries before they can fully reconstruct -- >> doctors are a bit tight-lipped about what they are doing. they are giving her privacy but do know for sure she still has surgery to go through. >> amazing you. the whole world is watching. the other story that we want to talk about is india. there was this gang rape some time ago what can you tell butts incident that sparked all of this? >> a very brutal gang rape on a public bus, miguel. a woman, a 23-year-old medical student, raped and not just brutally raped but also assaulted in a way and thrown out of the bus in a way that left h hanging
forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. you can stay in and like something ♪ or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> holiday travel plans disrupted and holiday shopping made for complicated. heavy snowfall and powerful winds have gripped several states. mountains of california, up to five feet of snow expected there. heavy rain prompting flood warnings, closing highways in napa, and back east western new york, lake-effect snow blanketing areas around cleveland and buffalo and high winds are threatening to delay flights at busy airports in new york, philadelphia, and washington d.c. some of the estimated 87 million americans traveling these holidays have -- or this holiday have no doubt made it their christmas destinations. ma
the best interests of the american people first. >> plus, keeping our kids safe, is arming educators the symptom or adding to the problem. >>> and can anyone beat sko brown? >>> good day. we're live in washington this afternoon. the lines of communication between the president, leaders of congress are open. whether those lines are used repeatedly over the next few days to reach a fiscal cliff deal is anybody's guess. joining me now for our daily fix, nbc's kelly o'donnell is live on capitol hill. kelly, i want to start with you. senator scott brown just tweeted out to all his followers that he was getting on a plane heading to washington. the president has apparently sent over a new deal to the senate. what can you tell us about this new fiscal cliff deal that president obama has sent over to senator leaders? >> well, the power of social media to get the word out. gop sources say in the conversation with the president, he indicated that he does have a bill he would like to bring forward to the hill today. they have not seen that. it would be a package to deal with averting the fiscal
. gregg: what do you think? >> i think i want to go after the whole legal educational complex. as a legal employer myself i can tell you that my heart goes out to anyone graduating law school right now. mr. sullivan wants to say that they are providing you a legal education, a socratic-type experience, that's fine. put that on the brochure. have it in big letters when you get the nice gloss see brochure and say look, we are not here providing you with the skills you need to actually pay back this $250,000 in debt we'll saddle you werement we are providing you with an educational experience and let the cards fall where they may. it's absolutely an ethical problem. to realize how wrong this is look at what goes on in medical schools. you don't see thousands of medical students graduating medical school with no prospect of employment. if the medical schools can calibrate the number of admission slots to the need for doctors why can't the a ba do the exact same thing. gregg: i did teach a law school class and what they represented to their students, and truth there is no resemblance. >> the d
elementary school and killing 20 children and six female educators. calls for increased school safety, and at the same time, gun sales are on the increase. in november, there were more than 7200 gun purchase applications filed peeping >> we are projecting that we're looking at over 8200 barack applications being processed. >> more than 46,000 applications were processed. at the end of 2012, state police project 62,000 applications will be handled. state troopers will not speculate on why. some reasons are apparent -- the holiday season, some lawmakers proposing changes to gun laws. >> i think when people see schoolchildren slaughtered, they get the message that something has to change. that is our hope. >> last year maryland had 398 murders. 272 were committed by people using firearms. 260 happened by way of handguns. 5 by shotguns, three by an unknown firearms. >> i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school. >> that is the security stance of the national rifle association. armed police did not pr
that are on the top are states that educate their young people, states that have taken the issue of obesity and exercise very seriously. the states on the bottom tend to be poorer states but that is not mutually exclusive because you have states like oklahoma and alabama, who have actually moved up in the rankings. so the issue is one of education. accessibility to the better foods, supermarkets coming into neighborhoods. for instance, in certain neighborhoods, there's really a lack of green groceries and mrs. obama has shed a lot of light on that subject, to our credit. and i think that was we go along and we come to understand these are very expensive issues, i mean, obesity costs us $190 billion a year. that is an incredible amount of money, and the other way to look at it is, we use about 1.1 billion gallons, extra of gas lane, owing to obesity. 1% of the gasoline we use is related to obesity. >> heather: it is just not mon taylor, that it is costing. it also costs us in lost time and also lost productivity. >> exactly. but the real problem with obesity is childhood obesity. and we have
or ourselves, then we're going to be held accountable. we have a program that's focused on education. it's on discipline. and when people don't meet the standard of the nfl, we're going to take action. there are consequences for that. >> what do you worry about the most? >> i worry about player health and safety. that's the number one challenge and focus. we want to keep our athletes safe and also athletes not just football or in the nfl, but every level. and efvery other sport. >> television coverage makes it attractive to watch at home rather than the stadium. is it a problem for the owners? >> it's a challenge for us. watching it in high-definition super slow-mo is a great experience. that's gotting to change. our challenge is how do we make sure that that same kind of experience happens in the stadium, so we're bringing technology into the stadium. we're working harder to making sure that the fans feel safe. they have to have a great experience. >> you wrote a famous letter which i have talked to you about before. written to your father. and you said two thing, i
a little bit of my real, real concern. i'm a former educator for years. and i sat at a desk and listened to parents that would actually sit down and cry that they just didn't know what in the world to do with their child, and they can't control them, and the child is at 10-14 years old. both of those parents work and leave children alone. i think the real, real, real problem and the real solution, and it's just like the former person that just called saying about the guns are out there. they are going to get them whether they get them legally or not, mental illness. you've got deal with that. but, and government rest her soul, the mother of this boy that did the shooting was killed by her own guns that she made available to that young man and taught him and took him to the gun range to shoot it, and i know that she was educated enough to understand that that child had a problem. what kind of parent would allow him to have access to those guns? he went out and -- host: sorry dean. that's dean in kansas, a member of the n.r.a. a couple of identity ms on facebook. host: lynn in hunting town
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
taliban, because she wants education for girls. we have video of malala yousufzai. let's talk about that. >> i have a new dream, so i thought that i must be a politician to serve this country. >> why did you change this dream. >> because there are so many crises in our country, i want to remove them. >> and you notice there is a little bug here, which is why we have that video ready to go. krystal ball, your person of the year, you can just say i agree. >> i have to go with president obama. mine is corny, too. he really survived a lot of adversity, so -- >> i don't think you have to make the case for the president being the person of the year. >> alex wagner, the person of the year. >> i would echo krystal, he purported himself with kindness, and integrity. >> steve, you're the tie-breaker, there are two for malala yousufzai. >> i'm not breaking a tie, going out on my own, family feud style. john roberts, supreme court justice, the height of the election season, immense pressure, he said you know what? the affordable care act, it stands. >> all right, coming up, the biggest winner and lo
. >> so to a young person today who's pursuing a career in education, they would also need to be trained and comfortedble with the idea of carrying a weapon? >> unfortunately, this is the world we live in. >> by that logic -- one last thing, david. by that logic, why not arm the students as well. >> because the students are children. you don't arm children. >> an 18-year-old? a high school? an 18-year-old high school senior, i mean, by your logic, they, too, should all be carrying weapons. and the lunch ladies and the bus driver? >> no, but the college kids should be armed. absolutely. they have the right to protect themselves. the government cannot protect us. they can't be everywhere all of the time. the government is this delusional thing. >> david, it's such a complicated segment. i hate to play into the sound byte mentality that this week has become. we're 5% of the world's population and we have 50% of the guns. >> i think today, the nra planted a flag on planet bizaro. i hate to use a sound byte like that. but we have more guns in this country and we have more gun violence in this
. host: at any time take after his father whether he would study classical education, becomes? guest: when he was five or six he was writing his only little history of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video g e game, age of kings. it is very -- you build your own castles and that was -- i let little play it as much as he wanted to. he took to reading and he loves histo faulkner. he is a reader. so, i just stand back because he will go wherever he goes. host: go back there. what about the 1980's. what work did you do then? guest: at a certain point after factories and bar tending my father had been an employee, the japanese with call him a company man in a small manufacturing company outside of boston and he had moved from sales manager to vice president to president without any equity. my brother and i both worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steams valves and heavy iron castings for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was lit manufacturing but -- light manufacturing but dirty, dusty. that is what our summer jobs consisted of. my
scandinavian and educated at a liberal arts college in the university -- he said to me, the low-scaled american worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. [laughter] he said it's sad, but it's true. the american-based ceo of the one of the world's largest fund managers told me about a conversation that handed in his investment committee. quite often people would tell me things like they didn't say it, but their friends said snit my kids do that also sometimes. so he said this is someone else on the investigating committee said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, imagine that
a plan to arm one educator in each school. he told a phoenix tv station it's a compromise between two extremes. >> on the one hand you have people proposing that any teacher wants to bring a gun to school. i think that would create more danger than it would solve and i'm opposed to that. you have other people who don't want to do anything as far as defense in the schools and i think we could regret that if there were another incident that might have been prevented. >> surely a big debate about that. under the plan each public school would designate one person to keep the gun in a secure, locked location. it would be a voluntary program. state law would need to be amended before that plan can move forward. >>> customers at starbucks this morning reacting to ceo howard schultz's plan telling workers in the washington, d.c., stores to write the words "come together" on coffee cups. >> "come together." a nice beatles quote there. i think it's kind of a cool idea, but i -- you know, i don't know that the politicians really care. >> i think it means that people are basically tired that cong
deserve but have a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home, school or any place. >> the taliban retaliated hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today, she is recovering in england. >>> number one, president barack obam obama. >> tonight, you voted for action. not politics as usual. >> after a long and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election 2340g 12, the president also won the supreme court's stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 201 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with a community shocked by senseless violence. >> these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn, atlanta. >> another ironman, another anchor man, another star trek, so many sequels to look forward to in 2013. our movie critic tells us which ones she is
. arizona's attorney general proposing to change the state law that would allow an educator in each school to carry a gun. the "l.a. times," the city of los angeles collected more than -- this story is unbelievable. they collected more than 2,000 firearms part of a guns for groceries buyback program. 75 assault weapons were included in that and two rocket launchers were turned in for cash. >> they got steak and shrimp for the rocket launchers. what about teachers with guns in classrooms? >> i mean, it's amazing to me. i had randy wine gart ten of the american federation of teachers on my show last night. it's outrageous to me on two levels. one, you're going to put more guns into schools it to try to deal with getting guns out of the school. you don't have money for students. you don't have money for sports and arts. you don't have money for anything you need in school, but you're going to find money to buy guns, bullets and training for teachers? where did the conservatives come up with this money from? how, if you had an armed teacher, would that have solved newtown? it would have made t
after she was assassinated. he spoke at a rally with his father. the president said his son's education is finished and his training has begun. two-time prime minister benazir bhutto was killed at a campaign rally in 2007. >>> and it's not all doom and gloom for the u.s. economy. home sales moved at the fastest pace in more than two years. sales rose more than 4.5%. sale were in-flighted by a temporary tax credit for home buyers. and investing more than $773 million in the manufacturing plants in michigan, the. says it will update and he can pand production lines at six plants in the state and creating more than 2,000 hourly jobs. it's all part of a deal that ford made to invest more than $6 billion in u.s. plants by the year 2015. >>> and a mother who hoped to spend christmas with her husband and two children turned to the online community for help. she was facing mountain bills and a major surgery. our affiliate wftx has her story. >> in this four-minute youtube video, jennifer johnson doesn't say a word but yet says so much as she tells the story of her heart condition that would kil
the congressional hearings and the stuff about the educational stuff, all the policy-making situations. thatnk it's a great thing washington d.c. has all these things and c-span covers it. >> eric want to c-span on comcast. created by america's cable companies in 1979, run to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> "washington journal" continues. host: randal o'toole is a senior fellow at the cato institute in washington and is the author of this book on how government undermines the dream of home ownership. thanks for being with us. >> good morning. glad to be here. host: how does the government affect homeowners buying a home? guest: 45% of american housing is in states and urban areas that have severe land-use restrictions, urban growth boundaries to prevent urban sprawl. they have other kinds of restrictions such as onerous permitting processes that it takes up to five years to get a permit to build up to one house. that makes it very hard for builders to meet demand for housing. when that happens, housing prices become very expensive. homeownership rates dropped. the federal
the country, parents understandably are scared. educators are concerned about security in schools. let's go to utah where the teachers will be getting weapons training today. and arizona's attorney general plans to have trained or principal trained with a gun inside the school. basically they're not saying they want the teachers to go roaming the halls with a gun. but this is like the last standr classroom. >> clayton: the first response are how are they going to allow guns in utah. in utah, one of the few states that allows guns in public schools, the legislature there had that state's rights, that's how they've done it for years. what the school says to your point, we don't want them roaming the halls, but it's free. we're going to waive a $50 fee on training so if you want to learn how to hold a gun, concealed weapons holder, get more training. the argument from gun advocates is they're much more able to quickly respond should some mad man come into a school than police having a swat team get there five, six, seven minutes later. >> kelly: the same thing holds true for arizona. i know wh
their educational development and development as adults? >> well, we have great studies that tell us once they start smoking marijuana their iq drops significantly. their sports activities decline, their mathematical skills decline. and in fact, here is something that's amazing, it exacerbates their mental capacity, in other words, if they have some mental disabilities, it heightens it and so, we are not taking care of our teens because we want taxes, we want money. >> kelly: oh, i see. you want to do more. bishop there are 18 states out there, including the district of columbia that allow the smoking of marijuana for medicinal purposes. let me go beyond that, what can you do to stem the tide and make people aware of the harmful effects of marijuana use? >> well, we first have to talk to the parents. i want to talk directly to the parents this morning if you allow me. parents, all teens are not smoking marijuana don't believe the hype that marijuana is okay. it's a very harmful drug, you have to talk to your teen. although 18 states said it's medical and teens are buying into that, you must sit dow
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
a plan to arm one educator in each school. under that plan, each public school would designate a person, either a principal or teacher to keep the gun in a secured, locked location. it would be a voluntary program. the attorney general says state law would need to be amended before that plan could move forward. >>> and happy new year chicago. beginning january 1st, chicago's parking meters will be the most expensive in north america. a 75 cents jump doesn't sound like a lot. listen to this. the price will then be $6.50 per hour downtown. that is more expensive than san francisco and even new york. and even leaps over vancouver for most expensive on the continent. for an expanded lookal all of our top stories head to cnn.com/earlystart. also search for us on twitter and facebook, search early start cnn. >>> one of the largest settlements of its kind. coming up, toyota paying billions to customers past and present, impacted by those stuck accelerators. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we
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